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project details

Freedom of Information Practice to Advance Issues, Advocacies, and Related Rights

Organization(s)

Right to Know Right Now! Coalition (R2KRN)

  • Contact

Basic Project Information

The Right to Know Right Now! Coalition trained Filipino CSOs on how to file and track access to information requests in order to support their ongoing efforts to lobby Congress to pass the Freedom of Information bill.

Methodology / Approach

Project Summary

Objectives

Build public demand for freedom of information (FOI)

  • Enforce transparency and accountability policies and norms to combat corruption
  • Nurture a community of practice composed of citizens and civil society organizations (CSOs) claiming their right to information through methodical, evidence-based research, documentation, and simultaneous filing of requests for information

Summary

The Right to Know Right Now! Coalition (R2KRN), a multi-sectoral alliance of CSOs committed to advancing freedom of information (FOI) in the Philippines, partnered with the Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism (PCIJ) to train coalition members on how to conduct evidence-based research and how to file and track access to information requests. R2KRN invited all interested coalition members to participate in a two-day training, led by PCIJ. During the event, representatives of 12 CSOs received training on how to request information from government agencies, discussed existing FOI laws and advocacy efforts, and obtained log sheets and other materials to guide their future access to information activities. The CSOs divided into three distinct groups, based on their existing research agendas, to focus on specific FOI themes:

  • Transparency and Good Governance: Budget, Health, and Elections
  • Industrial Policy (ASEAN Economic Community)
  • Welfare and Rights of Farmers, Migrant Workers, Civil Servants, and Consumers

Building on the skills gained during the training event, each group approached government agencies relevant to their FOI theme to request documents. CSOs tracked requests and responses from government in real-time through a shared google doc. PCIJ compiled and collated CSOs’ findings, which revealed major backlogs in the time it takes government to release information in response to requests, as well as a lack of uniform procedures for disseminating information. R2KRN shared these findings with coalition members and other CSOs across the Philippines, and continues to use this research in advocating Congress for the passage of the FOI bill.

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

12 CSOs trained

Target Population

Citizens and civil society organizations
Results

Evaluation

No formal evaluation conducted

Results Methodology

Self-reported results

Indicators Used

Not applicable

Reported Results

  • Increased receptivity of policymakers to the proposed FOI bill
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project details

Sustaining Peace through Improved Access to Quality Basic Education (SPACE) for Children

Organization(s)

Wahana Visi Indonesia

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

Wahana Visi used a combination of rights education, facilitated dialogue, and joint action by citizens and local authorities in order to find ways to improve primary education quality in Indonesia.

Sector

Sub-Sector

Tool Types

Project Summary

Objectives

Improve the quality of primary education

  • Raise community awareness about rights and education policy
  • Promote dialogue between citizens and local authorities on education issues
  • Increase school and local authority capacity to deliver quality primary education

Summary

Wahana Visi combined multiple social accountability approaches to improve primary education quality in selected districts across Indonesia. The project used World Vision International’s Citizen Voice and Action approach, which involves community education about their rights and the services to which they are entitled, collaborative government-civil society efforts to identify gaps between promised service quality and what is actually delivered, and advocacy efforts to address those gaps. The SPACE program adapted this methodology to the education sector and included three main activities:

  • Capacity building for students and parents about their rights and existing education policies
  • Promoting dialogue between students and families, and service providers
  • Strengthening local authorities’ capacity to provide primary education 

These steps uncovered multiple problems, including a lack of training and capability among teachers, supervisors’ inability to assist and support teachers effectively, and an overall lack of monitoring and supervision in the school system. The dialogue phase included forums for students and their families to work directly with school officials to explore these problems and develop solutions. On the basis of that dialogue, schools and local authorities designed and implemented a series of measures (trainings and joint monitoring activities) to enhance teaching methodologies, improve school governance, and strengthen district officials’ capacity to implement education policies. This often took the form of additional training and joint monitoring activities to ensure that reforms were sustained. 

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

24,615 people in assisted villages, and 1,579 students, 307 teachers, 41 Headmasters, 28 school committees, 5 Local Parliament Members, and 61 District Education Department Staffs across 2 districts.

Target Population

Primary education students, parents, teachers, schools, school committees and local authorities
Results

Evaluation

External

Results Methodology

An external consultant used the “concurrent embedded” methodology, including both quantitative and qualitative data from surveys, focus groups, key informant interviews, and document analysis. 

Indicators Used

Not available

Reported Results

Not available

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project details

Citizen Voice and Action for Government Accountability and Improved Service

Organization(s)

Wahana Visi Indonesia

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

Wahana Visi Indonesia is using community education and service monitoring, and joint community-government action to address policy and implementation gaps in Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (MNCH) service delivery at both the local and national level.

Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

Improve governance and public service delivery by enhancing transparency and accountability in maternal, newborn, and child health (MNCH) programs in select disadvantaged areas of Indonesia

  • Raise citizen awareness of rights and entitlements
  • Strengthen CSO capacity to monitor, influence, and engage with power holders
  • Develop performance criteria for health services using sex and age disaggregation criteria
  • Mobilize public action to improve health service delivery
  • Improve capacities of partners on Citizen Voice and Action methodology and program evaluation 

Summary

Building on Wahana Visi’s extensive experience working on Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health (MNCH), this project seeks to improve the quality of MNCH-related service provision by promoting community awareness and facilitating community-driven problem solving. The project applies World Vision International’s Citizen Voice and Action approach, which involves community education about their rights and the services to which they are entitled, collaborative government-civil society efforts to identify gaps between promised service quality and what is actually delivered, and advocacy efforts to address those gaps.

To do this, the project has five components:

  • Gathering information on existing MNCH policies and programs, and simplifying it for the public in order to identify opportunities to improve service delivery.
  • Civic education and CSO capacity building to enhance the knowledge about public rights and entitlements, to disseminate the simplified information, and to promote engagement to monitor and influence government agencies and service providers.
  • Creation of sex- and age-sensible community scorecards, which includes discussions to define service standards, the use of participatory monitoring and evaluation tools, and analysis of government agencies’ and service providers’ data to monitor service provision.
  • Sharing of gathered information with public authorities to gain their support, improve responsiveness of service providers, and advocate for policy reform or enforcement.
  • Sharing the Citizen Voice and Action methodology and program evaluation techniques by developing a series of knowledge and learning activities.

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

More than 52,000 people across 60 villages in 3 districts

Target Population

Integrated Health Service Post (Posyandu) service providers and users.
Results

Evaluation

Internal

Results Methodology

The evaluation follows the “realist” evaluation methodology and asks “for whom did this work, in what contexts, in what respects, to what extent, and how?” rather than “Did this work?” The evaluation will occur over the project’s three-year timeframe. It will aim to identify the project’s outcomes, seek to understand how those outcomes were reached, and what lessons they have for future use of the CVA methodology. The evaluation data will include surveys of households, public officials and workers, community-service provider action plans, “Most Significant Change” stories and interviews, and program administrative data.

Indicators Used

Not available

Reported Results

Not available

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project details

Social Accountability Knowledge, Skills, Action and Networking (SAKSAN)

Organization(s)

Concern Universal Mozambique

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

Concern Universal Mozambique aims to strengthen the capacity of civil society organizations to use social accountability tools to measure the performance of health service providers and to engage with them in collaborative dialogue to improve service provision.

Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

Improve the quality of life in Niassa and Zambezia Provinces through enhanced social accountability and responsiveness to citizens’ health service needs.

  • Enhance civil society organizations’ (CSO) and community based organizations’ (CBO) capacity to carry out evidence-informed engagement with government around transparency and accountability in the delivery of health services
  • Promote citizen engagement around locally identified issues influencing the quality of health service delivery
  • Share good practices and lessons learnt on how to measure service providers’ performance and how to use this measurement to effectively influence service provision 

Summary

Concern Universal Mozambique seeks to improve the quality of life of the most vulnerable populations by enhancing civil society’s capacity to conduct social accountability efforts and ensure health services’ responsiveness to citizens’ needs. In order to meet this goal the project has three components:

  • Increasing the capacity of local networks that represent the most vulnerable people (women, persons with disabilities, and people with HIV), by providing training on budget analysis, advocacy, and public expenditure tracking, and by enhancing their organizational capacities.
  • Increasing engagement between service providers and users around health service delivery by enhancing citizen capacity to access and use public information; strengthening CSOs’ and CBOs’ capacity to use social accountability tools (especially social audits, public hearings, and scorecards) to monitor service provision, and promoting evidence-based effective dialogue.
  • Promoting knowledge gathering and sharing by producing content, organizing workshops, establishing partnerships with the National Assembly’s working groups, and supporting media dissemination of this information.

Use of Information Communication Technology

Yes, short stories will be developed to be shared on websites and community radios

Scale

Health facilities in the project’s targeted regions

Target Population

CSOs, CBOs, and health service users, especially women, persons with disabilities, and people with HIV
Results

Evaluation

Internal

Results Methodology

An Outcome Journal will be developed. It will be updated with progress reports (monthly by implementation partners and bi-annually by the project team), recording project activities and observed changes

Indicators Used

  • Changes in the understanding and use of techniques and competences
  • Changes in resources dedicated to the provision of health services
  • Changes in rules
  • Changes in implemented tools and practices
  • Changes in ideas expressed
  • Changes in options of action considered
  • Changes in the articulation of points of view
  • Changes in service providers’ and users’ behavior
  • Changes in engagement practices 

Reported Results

No information available

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project details

Bayanihang Eskwela: The Citizens’ Monitoring of School Building Construction Projects

Organization(s)

Government Watch (G-Watch)

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

Bayanihang Eskwela aimed to enhance the quality of school buildings and prevent corruption through community monitoring of school building construction, and through collaborative work between communities and public agencies.

Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

  • Contribute to improved student learning outcomes by ensuring the quality of school building
  • Prevent corruption in school building construction programs
  • Build capacity to collect evidence about school building projects
  • Promote dialogue around findings and ways to improve school infrastructure projects

Summary

Bayanihan Eskwela built on previous G-Watch experience with community monitoring of education service delivery to monitor school construction projects and ensure they met quality standards and were free from corruption. To do so, they forged a collaborative agreement with the Department of Public Works and Highways and the Department of Education and supported communities’ efforts to monitor the implementation of school building projects. With a user-friendly checklist for gathering evidence and a standardized process of documenting and disseminating results, the monitors uncovered problems like omissions in community consultation requirements and flaws in the classrooms. They then used their findings to identify solutions among communities, schools, and contractors at the local level. G-Watch also used the findings in dialogue with government departments at the national level.

The project followed clear steps in order to overcome the impediments to addressing school construction shortcomings, including community mistrust of the government, and bureaucratic bottlenecks:

  • Creating formal agreements with public agencies to ensure their collaboration
  • Training community monitoring teams
  • Monitoring school building projects before, during, and after construction
  • Ensuring coordination and collaborative work between community and public servants to identify solutions to issues at the local level
  • Presenting monitoring results, and promoting dialogue with decision makers to address problems that were not resolved at the local level

G-Watch developed a partnership with the Office of the Ombudsman in order to facilitate access to school building project information when schools or local agencies were reluctant to share that information. After two iterations of the project were financed by external donors – USAID and UNDP – the Philippines Education Department decided to support the program directly, and G-Watch revised its methodologies to include assessments of the need for classrooms, in order to prioritize investments, and measures related to the quality of classrooms in terms of safety, sanitation and ventilation. 

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

70 schools in 39 districts and 9 cities across 14 provinces

Target Population

Students
Results

Results Methodology

Self-reported results

Indicators Used

Not applicable

Reported Results

  • Increased transparency in critical government procurement process
  • Enhanced responsiveness of public agencies and contractors to users’ needs
  • More than 900 community monitors mobilized and trained 
  • The Philippines Department of Education decided to support the project directly as its tool for citizen monitoring and engagement following the end of external funding 
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project details

Journey for Advancement in Transparency, Representation and Accountability (JATRA)

Organization(s)

CARE Bangladesh

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

CARE Bangladesh is promoting constructive collaboration between government and civil society to strengthen the Union Parishad’s public financial management systems to ensure that they are transparent and aligned with the decentralization process.

Project Summary

Objectives

Strengthen the Union Parishad (UP) public financial management systems to ensure they are transparent and aligned with the Local Government Act of 2009

  • Support citizen engagement in budget allocation, expenditure monitoring, and service quality assessment
  • Improve provision and access to information as stipulated by the Right to Information Act
  • Generate learning to support development practitioners, government, and donors to effectively implement social accountability tools for transparent and accountable budget processes

Summary

CARE Bangladesh aims to strengthen Union Parishad’s (UP) – local government units– public financial management systems by strengthening networks of CSOs, media, and government agencies at local and national levels. This work will support the identification and scaling up of best practices on participatory and transparent budget processes to improve accountability mechanisms and enhance Bangladesh’s decentralization process. To reach this aim the project includes three components:

  • Strengthening the capacity of citizens to engage in budget planning and implementation through the institutionalization of budget mechanisms that benefit local communities. This will include the development of community score cards (CSCs), the use of social audits to monitor public infrastructure, and the establishment of public expenditure tracking systems.
  • Enhancing provision and access to information, according to the Right to Information Act, by supporting transparency in the operations of UP’s councils relying on local folk groups, building partnerships with media, utilizing UP’s citizen help lines, and publishing citizen’s charters.
  • Generating knowledge sharing by facilitating "peer to peer" exchanges -between CSOs and UP’s agencies- for horizontal scale up, producing knowledge materials for a wider audience of stakeholders, and organizing lessons learned and advocacy workshops.

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

30,000 households across 15 unions in 2 districts

Target Population

Poor households headed by marginalized women
Results

Evaluation

No information available

Results Methodology

Not available

Indicators Used

Not available

Reported Results

Not available

See Complete Profile

project details

Textbook Count

Organization(s)

Government Watch (G-Watch)

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

Textbook Count was a collaborative initiative of G-watch and the Philippine´s Department of Education to tackle corruption in textbook procurement by mobilizing citizens to monitor bidding, production, delivery, and distribution of textbooks to all the schools in the country.

Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

  • Prevent corruption in textbook procurement
  • Ensure delivery and quality of textbooks to schools
  • Increase responsiveness of textbook suppliers
  • Mobilize volunteers and CSOs
  • Establish performance benchmarks for the Department of Education 

Summary

Textbook Count aimed to prevent corruption in textbook procurement through citizen monitoring. At the beginning, the project was limited to inspecting textbooks’ arrival at schools, but it grew to eventually monitor all stages of the procurement process and even to support distribution to schools. Volunteers implemented a straightforward process based on checklists to safeguard the integrity of the bidding process, ensure the quality of textbooks, and guarantee adequate delivery to districts and schools. 

The most common findings affecting the price, quality, and quantity of the books were the following:

  • delays in the delivery,
  • omissions of steps in the procurement process,
  • lack of resources for distribution,
  • inadequate storage facilities, and
  • impractical accounting procedures at the district and school level.

These findings were collected by regional coordinators and delivered to G-watch who organized problem-solving sessions with CSO representatives to present the findings to the Department of Education and find solutions.

This project is an example of using simple tools and processes to tackle relevant development challenges. In fact, Textbook Count led to interesting spin-offs in education, such as Bayanihan Eskwela, and other efforts in other sectors, including health and humanitarian assistance. Nevertheless, the project faced challenges sustaining engagement overtime, strengthening decentralized partners, and reaching schools throughout the country. These challenges affected Textbook Count’s success as a government-led program, in partnership with regional organizations, after G-watch stepped back in 2009. 

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

68% - 85% of textbook delivery sites in the Philippines

Target Population

Students
Results

Results Methodology

Representatives of the Department of Education and G-watch evaluated the project each year (after every round) using indicators collected from citizen’s monitoring reports and compared them to government goals and discussions about problems and accomplishments related to textbook procurement

Indicators Used

  • Percentage of textbooks monitored
  • Percentage of delivery points reached
  • Price of textbooks monitored
  • Number of findings identified
  • Number of schools reached

Reported Results

  • Between 68% and 85% of textbook delivery sites monitored
  • More than 60 million textbooks monitored
  • Textbook cost reduced by 50%
  • Increased responsiveness of publishers improving production, distribution, and rectifying reported errors
  • Reduced textbook procurement cycle from 24 months to 12
  • Reduction of leakages in textbook procurement 
  • Institutionalization of the project and replication in other sectors
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project details

Enhancing Accountability and Performance of Social Service Contracts in Uganda

Organization(s)

Africa Freedom of Information Centre (AFIC)

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

AFIC is working with government agencies to improve and support the use of tools for monitoring public procurement in health and education, and creating coalitions among key stakeholders to monitor a particular agriculture program.

Tool Types

Project Summary

Objectives

Enhance transparency and accountability of public contracting in the agriculture, education, and health sectors

  • Promote participation, monitoring, and feedback on agricultural advisory and extension services and distribution of goods
  • Establish a network of health and education community monitors equipped with the necessary tools and skills for transparency and accountability
  • Strengthen Uganda Contracts Monitoring Coalition’s technical and institutional capabilities
  • Document and share project tools, methodologies, experiences, and lessons about contract disclosure and monitoring

Summary

AFIC is monitoring contracts in health, education, and agriculture programs using two different strategies. The first strategy involves improving and supporting the use of tools for monitoring public procurement in health and education. AFIC is developing manuals and computer systems to monitor contracts, while also working to improve the government’s existing tools for contract monitoring, including the website Askyourgov.ug. The project also trains community monitors to monitor public contracts, supports their engagement with government officials, and promotes media and advocacy campaigns using monitoring results.

The second strategy involves creating coalitions among key stakeholders to monitor a particular agriculture program. AFIC is working with faith-based leaders, women, and youth to participate in and monitor the implementation of the Agricultural Technology and Agribusiness Advisory Services (ATAAS) program; ATAAS, funded by the World Bank, seeks to increase agricultural productivity and commercialization through agricultural technology and advisory services. In order to support the community’s efforts, the project also includes conducting a baseline assessment of the program, developing tools for contract and service delivery monitoring, training on those tools, and joint community-government monitoring of the ATAAS. The community will then use information produced in the course of monitoring the program to advocate for better governance.

Use of Information Communication Technology

AFIC is supporting improvements to the askyourgov.ug government website and developing a system to upload and analyze contract monitoring data.

Scale

2,537,100 people living in 5 districts across 2 regions

Target Population

Agriculture: local communities, specifically faith-based leaders, women and youth; Health and education: community monitors
Results

Results Methodology

Not available

Indicators Used

Not available

Reported Results

No Information
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project details

Making the Budget Work for Ghana

Organization(s)

SEND Ghana

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

SEND is working with the government and local civil society organizations to strengthen budget monitoring and responsiveness and to improve access to and quality of priority health and education programs.

Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

Improve access to and quality of services in priority health and education programs in targeted districts by strengthening accountability and transparency in the budget process by 2018

  • Create an enabling environment for constructive engagement between civil society organizations (CSOs) and the government
  • Generate information on budgetary allocations and expenditures for specific education and health programs vis a vis services delivery outcomes.
  • Develop mechanisms to capture knowledge and learning and facilitate exchange and uptake across CSOs, the PME Network, and government institutions

Summary

SEND Ghana is using different social accountability tools and mechanisms to strengthen civil society and government capacity to gather and use information to improve budget allocation, monitoring, and the development impact of priority health and education programs. In order to reach its objective SEND is conducting several activities grouped in three components:

  • Renewing and signing memorandums of agreement with government agencies (at both the national and local level), media organizations, and community radios, and strengthening the capacity of a network of 50 local CSOs on budget analysis and advocacy.
  • Strengthening budget monitoring on health and education programs. This component includes four types of activities: first, conducting a policy literacy campaign based on results from budget analysis; second, conducting participatory budget monitoring, social audits, community scorecards and designing a communication strategy to disseminate the findings; third, facilitating the development of “citizen budgets”  in selected districts and supporting PME network’s advocacy efforts at national and local level; and fourth, following changes introduced by government agencies in health and education programs.
  • Developing mechanisms to enhance knowledge, exchange and learning among local, national and international stakeholders on the links between social accountability and budget monitoring to development outcomes in health and education. 

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

50 districts across 4 regions

Target Population

All children of school going age, women, and children under-five, and persons with disability
Results

Evaluation

No information available

Results Methodology

Not available

Indicators Used

Not available

Reported Results

Not available

See Complete Profile

project details

Assessing Performance of Health Centre III in Reducing Maternal Mortality

Organization(s)

Action Group for Health, Human Rights, and HIV/AIDS (AGHA)

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

AGHA sought to improve maternal health services in Uganda by assessing user experience and increasing community members’ capacity to monitor and engage in service delivery.

Sector

Sub-Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

  • Improve the quality and utilization of maternal sexual reproductive health services (MSRH)
  • Increase the capacity of community members to monitor and engage in the delivery of MSRH

Summary

In order to improve maternal health services in Uganda, AGHA conducted an assessment of users’ experiences and brought together community members and service providers to collectively determine solutions to identified problems.  The project had two phases:

  • A Citizen Report Card (CRC) was conducted to first assess the availability, access, use, and quality of MSRH to identify factors hindering utilization, and generate evidence for AGHA’s advocacy efforts
  • A Community Score Card (CSC) then empowered local community members to discuss the CRC findings with service providers via facilitated focus group discussions to collaboratively create an action plan to address any issues

The project’s findings revealed that although availability and access to services were generally good, the utilization and quality of select aspects of services ranged from moderate to poor. Through CSC discussions, AGHA uncovered underlying factors potentially contributing to these larger issues, including weak grievance redress mechanisms, inadequate medicines, long waiting times, understaffing, and additional fees for services. Based on these findings, AGHA coordinated advocacy efforts at the national level to raise awareness of issues and advocate for policy change, infrastructure development, and other technical issues beyond the mandate of local governments.  At the local level, AGHA disseminated findings and encouraged local governments to integrate CSCs into their programming to enhance planning and resource allocation.

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

CRC: 610 households and 16 health facilities across 2 districts

CSC: 640 service providers and community members across 2 districts

Target Population

Mothers and expectant mothers
Results

Results Methodology

Not applicable

Indicators Used

Not applicable

Reported Results

  • Increased awareness of health rights by community members
  • Improved delivery of equipment and medicines, resulting in the:
    • Reduction of drug stockouts from 24 to 5 days, and
    • Monthly delivery of essential health commodities for mothers compared to every 2-3 months
  • Increased recognition of and support for MSRH delivery by development partners, NGOs, and government
  • Target districts adopted CSC-like interface meeting approach for future service delivery planning and management
  • Ministry of Health committed to review policy of payment to ensure free health services for mothers
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project details

Guarding the Integrity of the Conditional Cash Transfer Program

Organization(s)

Concerned Citizens of Abra for Good Government (CCAGG)

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

CCAGG aims to work closely with the government and engage citizens to ensure transparency and accountability in the implementation of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4P).

Tool Types

Project Summary

Objectives

Develop and advance a model for civil society-government partnership for transparent and accountable implementation of Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4P)

  • Mobilize household beneficiaries to engage in applied social accountability at the community level
  • Build capacities of CSO members of the Northern Luzon Coalition for Good Governance
  • Develop knowledge and learning activities about  social accountability on conditional cash transfer programs

Summary

Building on previous experience in monitoring 4P, CCAGG aims to work closely with the Department of Social Welfare and Development, RECITE and the NLCGG member organizations to ensure transparent implementation of the program. The project has 4 main components:

  • Institutionalize an ongoing third party monitoring mechanism led by CSOs that is aimed at promoting community participation around identified gaps using existing knowledge and information validated by applied social accountability tools
  • Promote cumulative development of parent leaders and volunteers by conducting applied social accountability as part of the empowerment component of 4P (this component will be led by RECITE)
  • Build capacities in NLCGG member organizations to use different social accountability tools
  • Conduct knowledge and learning activities to extract lessons from the project and share learning about social accountability on conditional cash transfer programs in the Philippines and globally

*This profile was built using information from http://www.worldbank.org/

Use of Information Communication Technology

Yes - the project will create a knowledge & learning platform for social accountability on Conditional Cash Transfer Programs

Scale

35 local government units across 14 provinces in 3 regions

Target Population

Beneficiaries of 4P in targeted provinces
Results

Evaluation

No information available

Results Methodology

Not applicable

Indicators Used

Not applicable

Reported Results

Not applicable

See Complete Profile

project details

Health Check: Monitoring Primary Health Care Services in Rural Tanzania

Organization(s)

Daraja Development Limited

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

Daraja sought to improve the performance of primary health care facilities by gathering citizen perceptions of services and promoting dialogue between health service providers and community members to produce joint solutions to service delivery challenges.

Sector

Sub-Sector

Project Summary

Objectives

Improve the performance of primary health care facilities to better meet the needs of local communities

  • Promote dialogue on the quality of services delivered by primary health care facilities between health service providers, administrators, and users at the community, district, and regional level
  • Exert pressure on decision makers to improve the performance of primary health care facilities

Summary

Daraja conducted a health amenities assessment of primary health care facilities in order to monitor challenges related to resource allocation and improve the delivery of health commodities and services. Using the Community Score Card (CSC) methodology, the team sought to inform community members of available services and entitlements, and solicit their opinions about the accessibility and quality of primary health care services. Daraja documented both citizen and service provider perceptions of staffing levels, infrastructure, patient treatment, absenteeism, and medicine availability. They gathered this data through structured questionnaires, key-informant interviews, focus group discussions, and patient exit interviews. Local leaders, community members, and health workers then participated in interface meetings to share findings and develop action plans for obtaining commitments from district and regional health officers and government leaders for health sector improvements. Citizens and service providers alike identified a number of health service delivery challenges, including persistent drug stock outs of essential medicines, unutilized medicines, lack of equipment for communication and transport, poor motivation of health workers, and infrastructure problems due to inadequate funding. Daraja shared the outputs of the CSC process with district and regional medical offices, as well as with the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare at the national level, advocating for increased funding for health services with a particular emphasis on essential medicines. They also utilized their organization’s newspaper, Daraja Letu, to share research results with the general public.

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

4 health facilities in each of the project's 8 districts

Target Population

Primary health care recipients
Results

Results Methodology

Self-reported results – Daraja conducted site visits to dialogue with medical personnel and beneficiaries in order to assess changes (if any) and document any complaints that still existed.

Indicators Used

Not applicable

Reported Results

  • 13 additional health workers employed in target project areas
  • Health workers relocated to understaffed health centers in target project areas
  • Target health centers received a government-issued warning letter to curb absenteeism
  • Increased visits by regional and district level government leaders to health centers
  • Reduced number of complaints regarding lack of laboratory testing kits and equipment
  • Increased citizen awareness of their health rights
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project details

Medicine Monitoring Project (MMP)

Organization(s)

National Citizen’s Movement for Free Elections (NAMFREL)

  • Contact
  • Website

Basic Project Information

NAMFREL mobilized its nationwide network of volunteers to monitor health service procurement and delivery with the goal of improving access to medicines and service delivery.

Sector

Sub-Sector

Methodology / Approach

Project Summary

Objectives

  • Improve the efficiency in the health service delivery
  • Increase community engagement in health
  • Establish a more transparent and efficient system of procuring and stocking medicines

Summary

Building on their previous commitment with the Department of Health (DOH) to monitor medicine procurement, NAMFREL implemented a two-phase project aimed at improving the efficiency of health service delivery. The first phase was intended to test the methodology and the second to scale it up. NAMFREL’s team mobilized its local chapters and other local NGOs to train and support community volunteer monitors. Once trained, volunteers engaged in monitoring procurement, distribution, storage, and delivery of essential medicines in hospitals and regional Centers for Health Development (CHD). Watching for omissions in the procurement processes and flaws in the distribution chain, volunteers identified issues related to discrepancies in distribution to hospitals and CHDs; availability of medicines and their cost; and inadequacy of storage facilities. During the project’s second phase, NAMFREL introduced three new measures in order to improve the methodology:  a warehouse checklist; a pricing survey; and a process to gather and check hospitals’ and CHDs’ documents. Hospital and CHD principals, as well as the DOH, supported the project from the outset, which increased responsiveness of officers at all levels. After the project ended, NAMFREL continued to mobilize volunteers around health procurement.

*This profile was built using information from http://ptfund.org/

Use of Information Communication Technology

None

Scale

Hospitals and CHDs nationwide

Target Population

Health service users
Results

Results Methodology

Scorecards completed by both government and civil society

Indicators Used

Not available

Reported Results

  • Increased trust in DOH
  • Monitored procurement worth 1.7 Billion Philippine Pesos
  • Improved availability of essential medicines
  • Reduced discrepancies in the delivery of drugs and medicines to hospitals and regional health offices
  • Improved responsiveness of hospitals and regional health offices
  • Increased competitiveness of bidding prices, reflecting  more realistic market prices
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